Frightening Statistics

OVER 6,000,000 DOGS AND CATS WERE KILLED ON US ROADS LAST YEAR. 

Omnia - Dog Post

In the US approximately 1.2 million dogs are killed on the roads each year. The figure is a scary 4 times that for cats at approximately 5.4 million! The same thing is also happening in the UK.

In most cases these accidents happen all for the same simple reason. That the dog cannot be seen in time for the motorist to stop. It doesn't matter what size or colour your dog is, in the dark they become a hidden target.

So how do we stop these easily preventable deaths? Simple!

Increase visibility of the dog and owner to oncoming traffic. With our LED Collars, Leads and Harnesses you and your dog will be spotted over 100M away no matter how dark it is!

Just see for yourself!

STAY BRIGHT AT NIGHT! OUR LED COLLARS KEEP YOUR PUP SAFE AND IN SIGHT ON THE ROAD OR IN YOUR GARDEN.

Does your dog wonder in the garden at night?

Keep your pup in sight wherever he goes by switching on his or her collar!

TAKE CARE IN AN EMERGENCY

If your dog is hit by a car then it is likely he or she will continue like normal or slightly timid to hide the paid they may be in. This is a survival instinct as showing weakness in the wild makes them look vulnerable.

If in doubt always have your dog checked over by your chosen veterinary practice, even if its just a phone call to tell them what's happened they will be able to advise you the best course of action to take.

Every dog owner has a duty and responsibility to have contingency plans to pay for unexpected veterinary bills, this is part of the cost of having a dog and should be considered before even adopting. In a perfect world pet insurance should be made compulsory, just like it is compulsory to have motor insurance. Until then, we each just have to do the best we can.

TRAINING

Dogs who typically chase cars are at a much higher risk of being hit by a car. This habit can also prove dangerous for the dog walker. It is important to teach your pup not to chase cars!

When you have guests over, it is imperative that you teach everyone not to chase your dog. This is extremely counterproductive to dog training and can put your dogs life at risk should it get off the lead.

When you chase a dog, you are teaching the dog to run away from you by triggering their instinct to run. A lot of people love doing this with their dogs or their friends dog as a fun activity. Unfortunately, while fun - this is very dangerous and you are teaching the dog dangerous habits.

If you need your dog, or another dog to come to you, then you will want to run away from the dog. This seems counterintuitive, but it usually works quite well. If you cannot run, then try walking away. You can even try backing away in an enticing manner. You can try pretending like there is something exciting on the ground near you, or even get on your back - but NEVER chase a dog! 

STAY BRIGHT AT NIGHT! OUR LED COLLARS KEEP YOUR PUP SAFE AND IN SIGHT ON THE ROAD OR IN YOUR GARDEN.

IN THE EVENT OF AN ACCIDENT

Approach the injured dog with care, looking for signs of the injury, and be aware of any additional danger to yourself and the dog. If the dog is in the middle of a road, pick it up very carefully using a garment or a towel; be careful not to aggravate any injuries. Also, if possible fit a muzzle to the dog as it is likely to be in pain and could become aggressive and try to bite.

Enquire if there any witnesses who saw what happened, as this will help the vet to determine the best course of action.

Your first priority is to determine if the dog is breathing. If the dog seems to be unconscious, pinch its ear as a response will confirm if it is really unconscious. It is also advisable to keep the telephone number of your vet in the memory of your mobile phone, so that you can contact him without delay.

To determine if the dog is breathing, look to see if its chest is rising and falling. If it is not breathing, artificial respiration must be carried out as soon as possible. Then check to see if it has a heartbeat, which can be done by checking if the dog has a pulse by placing two fingers on the inside of its rear thigh. If its heart is not beating, chest compressions must be carried out.

Thanks for reading! To stay up to date with our latest news and blog be sure to follow us on Facebook! but more importantly stay safe walking your dog!

To view the collars and leads shown above please click here -> LED Light Up Safety Collar

 *the data on this subject is not regularly collected. Information is taken from a study done by 25 New England schools and extrapolated.


1 comment

  • This is a great post thank you very much for the information, we walk our dog along the road to get to the park so will definitely keep this in mind. The collars are a great idea, especially at the moment because its dark after work. I have already ordered one and cannot wait to receive it!

    Sandra

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